Trimmer Analytical Report

Websites Visited

Gmail
Facebook
weightwatchers.com
Element K
Google
Weather.com
NYTimes.com
PandoraRadio
TCM.com
Wachovia.com

Description of Usage and Daily Usage

Over the course of a week I used the Internet for 33.5 hours (rounded). The Internet took up about 20% of my week. If I had a large assignment coming up I’m sure my web use would have been more though. Days when I had more homework were spent online. Sites I visited were very consistent. I had a bit of a routine if you will.

Gmail (10-20 times per day): I have an obsession with checking my e-mail. I also frequently use the Google chat/video-chat services available because it is convenient and easy to use.

Facebook (10-20 times per day): I used Facebook mostly as a distraction and tended to remain logged in all day. It is the best means of procrastination, in my personal opinion. I used it mostly for social networking purposes and some "gaming." In terms of social networking I posted comments on people’s statuses, walls and photos and updated my personal status. I also played the game Petville frequently, which allows me to pretend I have a pet. I named him Spanky after my dog at home. It's really quite shameful and depressing, but I miss my dog!

Weightwatchers.com (5-10 times per day): This website tracked my food intake, tracked my workouts, and recorded change in weight over the course of the week. By tracking I mean I typed in what I ate and how long I worked out and how much weight I lost. I also used it to find the points values of certain foods and look up recipes for dinner.

Element K (once): This was a class assignment. I had to do an online tutorial on Adobe InDesign. It took a total of two hours.

Google (5-10 times per day): This site is used to search information whether random or pertinent to a class assignment. During this week most of it was random.

Weather.com (once per day): I check the daily weather so I know what type of clothing to wear.

NYTimes.com (once per day): I like to pretend I read the news – mostly I just scan the headlines because my attention span/available time does not usually permit me to read full articles. If I find something very compelling I will read it in full.

PandoraRadio (0-2 times per day): My iPod is retarded and I get bored with my iTunes so I listen to Pandora for variety, usually in the morning. Current favorites include a Jack Johnson and Lily Allen station.

TCM.com (5-10 times per week): I like old movies and this website provides information on the “old movie” schedule.

Wachovia.com (2-5 times per week): I go to this website because it provides vital financial information about whether or not I am broke.

Analysis

My use of Web 2.0 technologies did not surprise me. I was well aware I spent too much time procrastinating on the Internet. I rely heavily on Gmail because I am in a long distance relationship and the chat service is very handy. I used to use iChat but since discovering Gmail have not because it is easier to have a video chat with someone on a P.C. computer. (I have a Mac). Web 2.0 technologies as a whole enable people to present themselves in a particular way. After writing my user diary, I find myself trying not to use Web 2.0 technologies like Facebook as often, but failing miserably. I feel the need to be constantly connected and knowing what is going on in the world of people I know, even though I feel like the tangible things like my sister being in the next room should entice me more. It also enables us to present ourselves as we perceive us to be. I see that all the time on Facebook now and notice myself doing it more. My profile photo is one that I think I look thin(ish) and pretty in. I untag photos with alcohol. My status usually exhibits some sort of emotion or thought I have because I want my friends to know when I have that terrible paper due and I need their support. I used to use MySpace but it was too much effort to keep up with both it and Facebook. Because more people use Facebook, I deleted my MySpace account once I got to college and don’t regret it.

The information I get online versus from traditional media is easier and quicker to find. Since using online resources I have noticed that I have less patience. I want to know what I need to know now. The only reason I go to a library is to have a quiet place to do work. Most books can be found online now as well, somewhat rendering printed text obsolete. I do miss them though. It’s a catch-22 of sorts because the Internet is so helpful and easy, but I miss the feeling of accomplishment I get from turning pages and reading a book cover to cover.

I know Google manages the information I get. I very rarely, if ever, look past the third option. Different key words get me different results sometimes as well. With print media I have to search out the information myself and I decide what I think is important by highlighting or making notes. I can’t do that when I’m searching in Google. They decide for me which websites are most applicable, just like by reading I decide which books are more applicable to a topic. Doing that though would require much more time. The web makes everything simpler so I don’t mind that it decides what information I get because I don’t have to. We all manage ourselves and our knowledge. The web is helping us do that more and more though. I cannot decide if I think it's a good thing or if it is creating a model for managing said knowledge. It attempts to understand what we would deem important and manage in that regard, but past that I see no model. People have always been managing knowledge, though on levels of importance. One thing that I find to be interesting in terms of knowledge management though is that most of this information is free right now. As the Internet begins to be a paid commodity, if it ever does, how will we react to it and what will happen to information then? Will we be assuming more important information is more expensive or will it remain the same based on its placement in a Google search? I think those are interesting developments we may see in our lifetime.

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